Made In A Lab — The Social Experiment Of Flies In Football Fields.

jdeposicion
5 min readAug 25, 2023
Photo by VD Photography on Unsplash

They all fell. One by one, season after season. They are all about to become a disappeared species. Meanwhile, two industries most benefit from it: Healthcare and the business-marketing sectors. It’s never been a better time for millioniares, that enjoy sending other millionaires monthly to the hospital, without any consequence on the humanitarian perspective. Footballing instances dropped footballers, and now, they are just flies falling for entertainment. The sickening thought of having an entertainment that slowly but surely does not entertain as much as it did ten years ago. The top of the pyramid however doesn’t exactly care about the non-reversible damages it has caused in the past years, forcing hundreds through unnecessary injuries. Everyone’s off much worse, and seemingly, we still complain. Is there a solution?

Since the COVID pandemic, the amount of injuries have become insane. Since the end of the pandemic, more and more matches are being added to an already overloaded schedule. More international friendlies, and more cups — including the Nations League and the Conference League. While their development hasn’t been harmful on the sporting horizon by any means (especially for the latter), the harm it is causing on players cannot be ignored.

It’s not only harmful for the players, that are forced to joyfully experience injuries after injuries, relapse after relapse, recovery after recovery. It’s not only about managers forced to rethink and innovate in their schemes, suddenly out of luck with star players out for months, sometimes even an entire trimester. No, it’s not only about the guys involved in football.

It’s about the fans. Where’s the fun in seeing your favorite 20 y/o being rushed to recovery because results need the player, only to be found injured a few weeks later (in the worst of cases, they suffer a knock right after substitution). The media has glorified new-age workoholics that rush themselves back to the pitch, disregarding the sad nature of injuries, temporarily restricting their mobility in their everyday life, in the worst of cases. Fans can’t get attached too long. Some fans even insult players for being injured, calling them “injury-prone”. What if they weren’t injury-prone, but simply have been broken and broken yet again?

--

--

jdeposicion

Football through a different lense, all things football.